Welcome to

St Isidore's Catholic Church

HO

-PE

“God is light; In him there is no darkness...”  

[1 John 1:5]

CELEBRATION OF PUBLIC WORSHIP following lifting of social distancing restrictions

 

St Isidore's and St Mary Magdalene's are now fully OPEN for the celebration of Holy Mass.

 

Following the lifting social distancing restrictions by the Scottish Government on Monday 9th August, there is no longer any need to reserve a place at St Isidore's. Please be advised that you are still required to wear a face covering, sanitise your hands when entering and exiting the church, and your details will still be collected for track and trace purposes.

If you are unable to attend Mass, you can watch a recorded Mass for Sundays only from our YouTube channel, and our Facebook Group on Sunday evenings.

 

Daily Mass and devotions will be available via a livestream service from our sister parish at St Mary’s in Lanark. These will be shared on our Facebook page.

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Upcoming Events

17

OCT
Mass - 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

6PM

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19

OCT
Weekday Mass (with Rosary at 10am)

10:30AM

St Mary Magdalene's

20

OCT
Rosary (please see FB group for details)

7PM

ZOOM

21

OCT
Weekday Mass

10:30AM

St Isidore's

24

OCT
Mass - 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

9 AM

St Mary Magdalene's

24

OCT
Mass - 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

12NOON

St Isidore's

RE-AD

Reflection for Sunday

The readings for today are: First Reading – Isaiah 53:10-11; Responsorial Psalm: Psalm 32(33):4-5,18-20,22; Second Reading – Hebrews 4:14-16; Gospel – Mark 10:35-45

Dear Brothers and Sisters, Good morning!

 

Today’s Gospel passage (cf. Mk 10:35-45) describes Jesus who, once again and with great patience, tries to correct his disciples, converting them from the world’s mentality to that of God. The opportunity is given to him by the brothers James and John, two of the very first whom Jesus met and called to follow him. By now they have gone quite a long way with him and in fact belong to the group of the 12 Apostles. Therefore, while they are on their way to Jerusalem — where the disciples anxiously hope that on the occasion of the celebration of Passover, Jesus will at last establish the Kingdom of God — the two brothers take courage, approach the Teacher and make their request: “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory” (v. 37).

 

Jesus knows that James and John are inspired by great enthusiasm for him and for the cause of the Kingdom, but he also knows that their expectations and their zeal are tarnished by the spirit of the world. Thus he responds: “You do not know what your are asking” (v. 38). And as they are speaking of ‘thrones of glory’ on which to sit beside Christ the King, he speaks of a “cup” to be drunk, of a “baptism” to be received, that is, his passion and death. James and John, always aiming at the hoped-for privilege, say in an outburst: yes, “we are able”! (v. 39). But here too, they do not truly understand what they are saying. Jesus forewarns that they will drink his cup and receive his baptism, that is, that they too, like the other Apostles, will take part in his cross, when their time comes. However, Jesus concludes: “to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared” (v. 40). As if to say: now follow me and learn how to love ‘at a loss’, and the heavenly Father will see to our reward. The way of love is always ‘at a loss’, because to love means to set aside egoism, self-referentiality, in order to serve others.

 

Jesus then realizes that the other 10 Apostles are angry with James and John, and thus show they have the same worldly mentality. And this offers him inspiration for a lesson that applies to Christians of all times, for us too. He says: “You know that those who are supposed to rule over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great men exercise authority over them. But it shall not be so among you; but whoever would be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be slave of all” (vv. 42-44). It is the rule of Christians. The Teacher’s message is clear: while the great people of the Earth build themselves ‘thrones’ for their own power, God chooses an uncomfortable throne, the cross, from which to reign by giving his life: “the Son of man”, Jesus says, “also came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many” (v. 45).

 

The way of service is the most effective antidote against the disease of seeking first place; it is the medicine for status seekers, this seeking first place, which infects many human contexts, and does not even spare Christians, the People of God, nor even the ecclesiastical hierarchy. Therefore, as disciples of Christ, let us receive this Gospel passage as a call to conversion, in order to witness with courage and generosity a Church that bows at the feet of the least, in order to serve them with love and simplicity. May the Virgin Mary, who fully and humbly adhered to the will of God, help us to joyfully follow Jesus on the way of service, the royal road that leads to Heaven.

- Pope Francis, Angelus, 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time, 21st October 2018 - 

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